Gunslinger

3069. GUNSLINGER (1958-USA) COLOR. With JOHN IRELAND, BEVERLY GARLAND. Directed by ROGER CORMAN. Scott Hood is the sheriff of Oracle, Texas. As he sits in his office one morning chatting with his wife Rose, the barrel of a shotgun appears in a window. A shot is fired. In an instant, the lawman lies dead. Rose Hood promptly grabs a rifle and blasts away at one of the assailants. Upon Hood’s burial in Boot Hill the following day, the town mayor announces that he has sent word to San Antonio for fabled gunman Sam Bass to come to Oracle and take over as sheriff. As he finishes speaking, the Widow Hood grabs a gun and plugs one of the mourners, whom she recognizes as her husband’s other killer. “I still have to settle with whoever hired them,” this feisty lady declares, Bass is set to arrive in town in two weeks, but Rose refuses to wait that long for justice to take its course. So, she hands the mayor her late husband’s badge and orders him to, “Pin it on.” “Who?” he asks. “Me,” she responds. The mayor complies and thus this no-nonsense lady “takes on a man’s responsibility” and becomes the sheriff of Oracle. Rose Hood is no peace officer with a corset. She wears pants, rides hard and straps on a gun as she sets out, not just to uncover the power behind her husband’s killers, but rid the town of all its corruption. The highlight of this excellent western is a nifty catfight between Rose and Erica Page, the shady lady who owns the town saloon. Also playing a key role is Cane Miro, a rough-and-tumble, gun-for-hire, who is a man on a deadly mission. 78 minutes. Western